Dissociative Disorders involve a break or separation of normally integrated functions of consciousness, identity, perception, and memory as a prominent feature. These symptoms may be sudden or gradual and brief or chronic in nature.

Dissociative Amnesia is a condition in which the patient is unable to recall extensive personal information of a stressful or traumatic nature. These symptoms significantly interfere with academic, work, or social relationships.  The amnesia may or may not be accompanied by dissociative fugue in which the patient engages in travel or wandering with no memory of their identity or autobiographical history.

Dissociative Identity Disorder, formerly known as Multiple Personality Disorder, is a disorder in which the patient has two or more distinct personalities, each with its own individual pattern of behavior, perception, and self-image. Two or more personalities routinely take control of the person’s body and behavior. The patient is unable to recall important present and past details of his or her life.

Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder is a disorder in which the patient has recurrent episodes of detachment from his or her own body or mental processes, and/or detachment from his or her surroundings. During such episodes the individual does not become psychotic or lose touch with reality. These symptoms significantly interfere with academic, work, or social relationships.